Mental Health

What are mental health problems?

Mental health problems vary from things we worry about every day to serious conditions that are life-long. Psychiatric and psychological professionals are trained to identify the symptoms of mental health problems to determine if the symptoms you are experiencing are situational or more serious and recommend the proper course of treatment.

Some common reasons to seek help…

  • Hiding your feelings for fear of other people’s reactions.
  • Feelings of sadness that don’t seem to go away.
  • Feeling hopeless.
  • Fatigue; feeling tired all the time or not getting out of bed for days.
  • Feeling anxious or scared, much worse than being nervous or cautious, avoiding daily activities.
  • Panicking, freaking out, freezing up, feeling like you can’t breathe, or even feeling physical pain when this happens.
  • Extreme changes in mood. Everyone is different and because mood is directly affected by hormones, it is difficult (especially for parents) to know whether mood swings are normal or not.
  • Problems paying attention, getting easily distracted, unable to remember instructions soon after being told that interfere with completing daily tasks at home, school or work.
  • Symptoms that interfere with someone’s perception of reality, i.e. hallucinations including seeing, hearing, smelling, or feeling things that no one else can.
  • Severe mental illness, such as bi-polar disorder or schizophrenia, affect people in extreme ways including periods when they lose touch with reality and are irrational.
  • Many people who experience mental health problems can benefit from treatment and learn to cope if they get help early on.